intensive floral workshop in Milan

 
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Last March I organised the intensive floral workshop in a new location “Le spezie gentili” in the heart of Milan. Spring was in the air as I strolled down on an unusually quiet tree line street showing the first signes of blossom on the trees. Once  arrived Valeria, the owner, gave us a warm welcome and looked after us very well throughout our stay.

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On Saturday we focused on how to create a basic bouquet. This was followed by the creation of a floral arrangement using a sponge base. I chose shades of pink to introduce the concept of colour. Pale pink scented “O’Hara” roses, radiant pink anemones were a perfect combination topped off with the dramatic purple-red ranunculus.

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On the second day we played around with a palette of spring colours. Deep red tulips, intense burgundy scabious were intertwined with romantic vintage “Garden” roses, lilac clematis and peach branches.

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For the floral arrangement in sponge the essence of spring was my inspiration.  Pastel tones of pink, light blue, delicate yellow were combined with a touch of vivid orange and red. Orange centred narcissus and bright red strawberries were perfect for this purpose.

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The next intensive floral course will be held in the beautiful hills of Custoza in Verona.

If you are interested please don’t hesitate to contact me.

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3 tips for a centre-piece with flowers from your gardens

 
 

Looking at the gardens so full of blooming flowers I thought about making a simple centre-piece with what nature offers us. I decided to create the arrangement working with just one colour and its different shades and consistencies.

The hue that I chose was the glorious red of my geraniums. You’re probably asking why I started with the colour and not the flowers. The reason being it narrows down the variety available. It’s essential to stick to one shade or a colour scheme when choosing the flowers you’re going to use. Keeping in mind this rule allows us the freedom to select the flowers and focus on the variety of shades, shapes and texture. I finally decided to match the geraniums with some oleander flowers and roses all with different hues of red.

Yesterday while I was on my way home, a blooming blackberry bush caught my eye. The graceful and tiny flowers seemed to have being drawn by children and are a pleasant reminder that summer is nearly here. I decided to use these to add lightness and frivolity to the centre-piece.

Fruit is also very useful when decorating a table. Shiny red cherries were the perfect choice that echoed the essence of summer. For movement and texture I added a sprig of rosemary, vine with tiny green grapes and some airy fennel bloom.

I use 3 small vases for this floral arrangement. Why 3? As the Latin saying goes “everything that comes in 3 is perfect”; a floral arrangement composed with 3 looks more natural and less forced than an even-numbered collection. Don’t be afraid to play around with the symmetry and asymmetry. Remember to use a simple vase if your composition is of a bold colour. For this centre-piece I used simple glass vases.

In a nutshell

  1. Decide on one colour

  2. Create a floral arrangement with 3 vases (glass or white ceramic or terracotta for a more rustic setting)

  3. Add fruit to give an extra special touch

  4. Enjoy and let yourself be transported by the colours